Some like it Hot (2011) Review


Delightfully funny, heart-warming, heart breaking and mind bending for its’ time, though the script had potential to be experimented with. Some like it hot gives birth to ultimate empathy men trading roles to experience what it means to live in a man’s world as a woman. Joe and Jerry find themselves in uncomfortable scenarios from being hit on by the resorts male population along with the very mobsters who were after them and being surrounded by a train full of beautiful band girls, all while disguised as their female counter parts Josephine and Daphne. Watching Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon I never envisioned them as women, but was floored by all their on screen transformations. Between the two actors, Jack Lemmon convinced me. From his overly giddy giggles to his shapely legs, Lemmon was born to play Daphne. Perhaps most memorable, seeing in Act IV Curtis repeatedly putting up his newspaper, trying act uninterested and mysterious to Sugar only to attract her undivided attention or Jack Lemmon wheeling out Curtis wearing heels while being pursued by Spats gowns, followed by theatrically ragtime. Critically, instead of Sugar’s ditsy demeanor being comedic and arresting, I received it as distastefully typical, but then reminded myself it was made in the nineteen fifties. I can drift back into the floating cabin, with Sugar and Joe nestled chest to chest. Some like it hot pushes the threshold of societal normality’s, especially “nobody’s perfect”, which was a shocker for 1950’s audiences (for those who do not know what I am referring to, watch it for yourself and you will understand). I was sincerely disappointed by Sugars submission to accepting what she so strongly protested against: Ending up with an old pair of socks and a squeezed out tube of tooth paste. But was completely disarmed by Joe’s change in behavior, from lusting after her to earnestly wanting to give the love of his life a man he felt she deserved, even if that did not include himself. The British captain persona Joe took on was a clear perception of what he thought Sugar wanted. But their final boat ride into the moonlight proved him wrong. A classic from the last golden year in America, it may not have been Marilyn’s best but it certainly was not her worst. Lively acted by the entire cast, I had no clue running from Chicago mobsters could be so funny.

Performances: 8/10 Directing: 9/10 Script/Dialogue: 8.5/10 Cinematography

Overall rating: 8/10

 


Advertisements

Comments . Opinions . Concerns

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: